Sunday, 29 January 2017

Chinese New Year

For some reason this wasn't published yesterday when it was due and ended up in the "Draft" folder.  "Better late than never" as they say:

Some celebrants call it the Spring Festival, a stretch of time that signals the progression of the lunisolar Chinese calendar; others know it as the Chinese New Year. For a 15-day period beginning January 28, China will welcome the Year of the Rooster, one of 12 animals in the Chinese zodiac table.
Sound unfamiliar? No need to worry: Check out 10 facts about how one-sixth of the world’s total population rings in the new year.

1.THE HOLIDAY WAS ORIGINALLY MEANT TO SCARE OFF A MONSTER.

As legend would have it, many of the trademarks of the Chinese New Year are rooted in an ancient fear of Nian, a ferocious monster who would wait until the first day of the year to terrorize villagers. Acting on the advice of a wise old sage, the townspeople used loud noises from drums, fireworks, and the color red to scare him off—all remain components of the celebration today.

2. A LOT OF FAMILIES USE IT AS MOTIVATION TO CLEAN THE HOUSE.

While the methods of honoring the Chinese New Year have varied over the years, it originally began as an opportunity for households to cleanse their quarters of "huiqi," or the breaths of those that lingered in the area. Families performed meticulous cleaning rituals to honor deities that they believed would pay them visits. The holiday is still used as a time to get cleaning supplies out, although the work is supposed to be done before it officially begins.

3. IT WILL PROMPT BILLIONS OF TRIPS.

Because the Chinese New Year places emphasis on family ties, hundreds of millions of people will use the Lunar period to make the trip home. Accounting for cars, trains, planes, and other methods of transport, the holiday is likely to prompt over three billion trips.

4. IT INVOLVES A LOT OF SUPERSTITIONS.

While not all revelers subscribe to embedded beliefs about what not to do during the Chinese New Year, others try their best to observe some very particular prohibitions. Visiting a hospital or taking medicine is believed to invite ill health; lending or borrowing money will promote debt; crying children can bring about bad luck.

5. SOME PEOPLE RENT BOYFRIENDS OR GIRLFRIENDS TO SOOTHE PARENTS.

In China, it’s sometimes frowned upon to remain single as you enter your thirties. When singles return home to visit their parents, they can opt for any number of people offering to pose as their significant other in order to make it appear like they’re a couple and avoid parental scolding. Rent-a-boyfriends or girlfriends can get an average of $145 a day.

6. RED ENVELOPES ARE EVERYWHERE.

An often-observed tradition during Spring Festival is to give gifts of red envelopes containing money. (The color red symbolizes energy and fortune.) New bills are expected; old, wrinkled cash is a sign of laziness. People sometimes walk around with cash-stuffed envelopes in case they run into someone they need to give a gift to. If someone offers you an envelope, it’s best to accept it with both hands and open it in private.

7. IT CAN CREATE RECORD LEVELS OF SMOG.

Fireworks are a staple of Spring Festival in China, but there’s more danger associated with the tradition than explosive mishaps. Cities like Beijing can experience a 15-fold increase in particulate pollution. Last year, Shanghai banned the lighting of fireworks within the metropolitan area.

8. BLACK CLOTHES ARE A BAD OMEN.

So are white clothes. In China, both black and white apparel is traditionally associated with mourning and are to be avoided during the Lunar month. That’s been a bit of a paradoxical tradition for Thailand-based Chinese, who are still wearing black in mourning over King Bhumibol, the decades-long monarch who recently passed. The red, colorful clothes favored for the holiday might be too bright, so some are opting for gold or silver.

9. IT LEADS TO PLANES BEING STUFFED FULL OF CHERRIES.

Cherries are such a popular food during the Festival that suppliers need to go to extremes in order to meet demand: Singapore Airlines recently flew four chartered jets to South East and North Asian areas. More than 300 tons are being delivered in time for the festivities.

10. PANDA EXPRESS IS HOPING IT'LL CATCH ON IN THE STATES.


Although their Chinese food menu runs more along the lines of Americanized fare, franchise Panda Express is still hoping the U.S. will get more involved in the Festival. The chain is promoting the holiday in its locations by running ad spots and giving away a red envelope containing a gift: a coupon for free food. Aside from a boost in business, Panda Express hopes to raise awareness about the popular holiday in North America.
MF

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