Sunday, 27 November 2016

Fun for the Elderly- 2

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The retirement home where students are invited to live rent free while helping its residents

The retirement home where students are invited to live rent free while helping its residents
Humanitas is not your typical retirement home, and its residents aren't typical seniors.

Knowing that those living in retirement communities face loneliness and isolation, and students often struggle to afford decent housing, Humanitas, a Dutch volunteer organization, decided to combine their needs. In 2015, six students from Saxion and Windesheim University in moved into the retirement home — rent free. They are, however, required to spend at least 30 hours per month with the elderly residents, as “good neighbors.” The students hold workshops, help with activities, and spend time getting to know the seniors. In turn, they get life lessons and advice, and the seniors feel more connected to the world, and everyone gets the benefit of a different perspective on things! (Source)



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The preschool that operates from inside a nursing home

The preschool that operates from inside a nursing home
The concept is similar to the previous on this list only with smaller kids. The young and the old connect and learn from one another at Providence Mount St. Vincent in Seattle. Home to about 400 elderly residents, the facility also houses the Intergenerational Learning Center, a preschool where children and seniors have the chance to bond.

Established in 1991, the ILC's purpose is to allow kids to learn about acceptance while also being nurtured. It also aims to help seniors develop a greater sense of self-worth and foster social interactions. Babies to pre-kindergarten-aged children attend art and music classes, as well as story and exercise time with the seniors. (Source)



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The documentary that follows teens as they teach seniors to use the Internet

The documentary that follows teens as they teach seniors to use the Internet
Cyber Seniors follows a group of senior citizens, aged between 76 and 93, as they discover the world of the Internet through the guidance of teenage mentors.

The documentary, directed by Saffron Cassaday, was inspired by a campaign set up by her sisters, Macaulee and Kasha, in 2009. The pair began recruiting friends to visit retirement homes twice a week to teach elderly residents how to use the Internet after witnessing first-hand how it had transformed their grandparents' lives. The group featured in the film all had different interests, with some eager to use Facebook to see photos of their grandchildren and others wanting to learn how to cook or find inspiration for traveling.

(Source)

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